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Category: Productivity (98 posts) Page 7 of 10

Lisa Crispin
Productivity

The Wonders of Workspaces

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Visibility is a wonderful thing. Making your team’s work transparent lets every stakeholder judge current status and progress at a glance. This transparency also reveals impediments—is one story blocked by another? Is something holding up progress? Are some activities turning into bottlenecks? Seeing a snapshot of a team’s current status and progress is also a conversation starter: “I have a question about this story—oh, I see that Joe, Debbie, and Mary are all working on it, I will ask them.” Read more...

Lisa Crispin
Productivity

Bugs and Chores: To Estimate, or Not to Estimate?

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Most of us prefer to spend our time developing new features for our customers. But we usually have some overhead in the form of bugs and chores that takes some of our time. Since Tracker started out life on greenfield projects, it has a default setting that bugs and chores don’t get point estimates. The idea is that bugs and chores emerge over time, and while they do take time to address, they’re an ongoing and fairly consistent cost. Read more...

Lisa Crispin
Productivity

A Healthier Approach to Estimating and Velocity

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Tracker’s mission in life is to give teams an up-to-date snapshot of where they are and where they are headed. When we look at our project(s) in Tracker, we know for sure what we’ve done and what’s currently in progress. Tracker uses that information to help us visualize what we’re likely to be able to do for the next few weeks. Read more...

Nina Mehta
Productivity

Remote Control

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Most people who have worked remote will agree—nay—commiserate on how hard it is. I’ve done it before, and while it never really gets easier, you learn to get used to it. Read more...

Paul Davis
Productivity

Gansen and Kunesh on Agile Development in the Obama 2012 Campaign

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The Obama 2012 campaign has been hailed as the most tech-savvy and data-driven to date, a sophisticated operation led by CTO Harper Reed. Reed had no problem finding developers eager to join the campaign—the challenge was finding people up for the formidable task before them. A Presidential campaign poses unique challenges: an environment where volatility is the only constant, developers must iterate often, yet there is little margin for error. To meet this challenge, Reed and his team placed an emphasis on people who could resolve problems and learn quickly, rather than focusing on a particular skill set. Read more...